The Antarctic krill new predators

A Chinese fishing boat sinks in Antarctica

On the 21st of April 2013, the Kai Xin, a 104m Chinese fishing boat, ablaze for four days, sank along the Antarctic coast. Blink and you would have missed this news snippet!

The Chinese krill fishing boat the Kai Xin that sunk along the coast of Antarctica © Chilean Air Force

A Norwegian fishing boat rescued the 97 crewmembers and the Chilean authorities told the media that there was no fuel leak and that the situation was under control. No environmental disaster: no international media headlines.

 

But the obvious question was not asked…

 

What was a 100m fishing boat with almost a 100 crew doing in this part of the Antarctic Ocean?

 

The Kai Xin was one of thirteen 100m-factory ships that hail from Chilli, China, South Korea, Norway, Poland and the Ukraine – all attracted by the same high value commodity: the Antarctic krill.

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